News

Barbara Prainsack has been interviewed by CNN

Barbara Prainsack has been interviewed by CNN on the ban of facial recognition in San Fransisco.

Find the video here


A new podcast by the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) featuring Ursula Huws (University of Hertfordshire), Aiha Nguyen (Data & Society), and our very own Barbara Prainsack, discusses digitisation and the future of work.
Listen here


Lukas Schlögl in Podcast on the Future(s) of Work

In this podcast @jimmygreer talks to entrepreneurs, policy makers and academics about what has become known as the future of work. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of online platform working; why it is so important and to make this new way of working fair; how some freelancers are making the most of digital; the impact of automation (or should that be ‘automatability’?) on emerging and developing country jobs; and what to do about the so-called ‘rise of the robots’. This podcast is the first in a series exploring the themes from our research into business models of the future. Click here to read a short summary of our latest report on Business Models of the Future https://tinyurl.com/y3an5trg

Guests: Willem Pieter de Groen (Centre for European Policy Studies), Romain Trébuil (Yoss), Ellen Thijs (B-Hive), Natalya Sverensky (NOBL), Brando Benifei (MEP), Luke Schlögl (University of Vienna)

 


Among others (see below) Katharina Kieslich published a new article in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine on "National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, social values and healthcare priority setting".

Littlejohns, P., Chalkidou, K., Culyer, AJ., Weale, A., Rid, A., Kieslich, K., Coultas, C., Max, C., Manthorpe, J., Rumbold, B., Charlton, V., Roberts, H., Faden, R., Wilson, J., Krubiner, C., Mitchell, P., Wester, G., Whitty, JA. and Knight, S. (2019) 'National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, social values and healthcare priority setting', Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. doi: 10.1177/0141076819842846.


New Publication by Katharina Kieslich

Katharina Kieslich pusblied a new article with the title 'Paradigms in operation: explaining pharmaceutical benefit assessment outcomes in England and Germany' in the Journal of Health Economics

Abstract:

Health technology assessments (HTAs) are used as a policy tool to appraise the clinical value, or cost effectiveness, of new medicines to inform reimbursement decisions in health care. As HTA organisations have been established in different countries, it has become clear that the outcomes of medicine appraisals can vary from country to country, even though the same scientific evidence in the form of randomised controlled trials is available. The extant literature explains such variations with reference to institutional variables and administrative rules. However, little research has been conducted to advance the theoretical understanding of how variations in HTA outcomes might be explained. This paper compares cases of HTA in England and Germany using insights from Kuhn (1962, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 2nd edn. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press) and Hall (1993, Policy paradigms, social learning, and the state: the case of economic policymaking in Britain. Comparative Politics 25, 275–296) to demonstrate how policy paradigms can explain the outcomes of HTA processes. The paper finds that HTA outcomes are influenced by a combination of logical issues that require reasoning within a paradigm, and institutional and political issues that speak to the interaction between ideational and interest-based variables. It sets out an approach that advances the theoretical explanation of divergent HTA outcomes, and offers an analytical basis on which to assess current and future policy changes in HTA.

Kieslich, K. (2019) 'Paradigms in operation: explaining pharmaceutical benefit assessment outcomes in England and Germany'. Journal of Health Economics, Policy and Law. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1744133119000203


New book: Debating Unemployment Policy - Political Communication and the Labour Market in Western Europe

The new book is published by Cambridge University Press.
Edited by Laurent Bernhard, University of Zurich, Flavia Fossati, University of Vienna, Regula Hänggli, Université de Fribourg, Switzerland and Hanspeter Kriesi, European University Institute, Florence.

Description:

In 2008 the world experienced the Great Recession, a financial and economic crisis of enormous proportions and the greatest economic downturn since the 1930s. In its wake, unemployment became a key preoccupation of West European publics and politicians. This comparative study considers the policy debates surrounding unemployment in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Denmark and Switzerland since 2008. With an over-arching focus on drawing out cross-national commonalities and differences, the authors ask whether patterns of political communication vary across countries. Their analysis draws on interviews with labour market policy-makers in the six selected countries, and paints a revealing picture. Appealing to researchers in comparative politics, political communication and welfare state research, this book will also interest practitioners involved in labour market policy.

Get your copy here.


IPW Lecture by Nikolas Rose

© https://nikolasrose.com/

The world-leading sociologist and theorist Nikolas Rose (King’s College London; nikolasrose.com) will visit CeSCoS for a week in December 2019. The highlight of his visit will be a lecture on the topic of his latest book, Our Psychiatric Future: Is another psychiatric biopolitics possible?

When: Wednesday 11th December 2019 | 18:00
Where:
Aula am Campus, Spitalgasse 2, Hof 1, 1090 Vienna

Abstract:

Psychiatry, since it took its modern form in the mid-nineteenth century, has always been a ‘political’  science - historically in relation to degeneracy and eugenics, mental hygiene, and the management of ‘dangerous individuals’ in the court and psychiatric system’;  today in relation to the ‘economic burden’ of mental ill health, the Global Mental Health Movement seeking to expand Euro-America psychiatry to the Global South, the challenges of mental disorder refugees, migrants and children in the Global North and so forth.   While much focus has been on the emergence of new ‘neurobiological’ styles of thought in psychiatric research, there are signs that a new psychiatric strategy is taking shape. This new biopolitics of psychiatry would focus less on treatment in the clinic, and more on the integration of psychiatry into the domain of public health.  In this talk I will consider the possibilities that psychiatry could become a branch of social medicine, identifying and addressing the forms of social adversity that give rise to mental distress, understanding the pathways by which they act, and transforming the power relations that have always characterised this form of expert knowledge. I will suggest that we are at a potential turning point and outline the possibilities for a new, different and politically progressive psychiatric biopolitics.

Find the poster here.